College News

Chinese troupe thrills audience, makes friends

Chinese troupe thrills audience, makes friends

click to enlarge ⊗

Shanxi University dancers and musicians from the People's Republic of China delighted and thrilled ... (more)

Chinese troupe thrills audience, makes friends

click to enlarge ⊗

Shanxi University dancers and musicians from the People's Republic of China delighted and thrilled ... (more)

Chinese troupe thrills audience, makes friends

click to enlarge ⊗

Shanxi University dancers and musicians from the People's Republic of China delighted and thrilled ... (more)

Chinese troupe thrills audience, makes friends

click to enlarge ⊗

Shanxi University dancers and musicians from the People's Republic of China delighted and thrilled ... (more)

Chinese troupe thrills audience, makes friends

click to enlarge ⊗

Han Chao (left), performing on the pipa, a Chinese lute, and Jia Jiangli, playing a guzheng, a zit ... (more)

Chinese troupe thrills audience, makes friends

click to enlarge ⊗

Flutist Xi Xiao and pianist Zhao Yichao perform 'Spring in the Date Garden,' a traditional folk so ... (more)

02.07.2012Arts & EntertainmentCollege & Community

SANFORD - The Chinese Year of the Dragon burst forth in colorful and exciting dances, beautiful and lively instrumental music, and graceful artwork as the Shanxi University Art Delegation performed Feb. 1 at the Dennis A. Wicker Civic Center.

"I absolutely loved it that we could get a taste of another country," said Angela Tomlinson, of Sanford, who brought her three children to see the performance.

Her young daughter, Nina, smiled and said, "I loved all the girls dancing; it made me want to go on stage and dance with them."

The Year of the Dragon, began Jan. 23. The dragon is the only legendary creature in the Chinese zodiac and symbolizes good luck, wealth, strength, and power. It is believed that children born during the year will have happy and abundant lives.

Central Carolina Community College's Confucius Classroom, in partnership with its N.C. State University's Confucius Institute, sponsored the performance. Both promote understanding between the people of China and the United States as well as education for a global economy.

"We are pleased to present another in an ongoing series of performances by outstanding Chinese university performance troupes," said CCCC President Bud Marchant. "The college is a resource for its communities and we welcome the opportunity to bring this rich cultural experience to our area."

The delegation performed traditional and current music of Tibet, Inner Mongolia, and Shanxi Province based on festival celebrations, love of homeland, and classic tales. The pieces ranged from a graceful love ballet, "Butterfly Love," to the energetic and fun "Vinegar" dance celebrating a widely enjoyed product of Shanxi Province.

The dances conveyed the emotions of evocative songs such as "Lofty Mountain and Flowing Water," "The Rising Sun on the Prairie," and "Spring in the Date Garden." Traditional Chinese instruments: the pipa (lute), guzheng (zither), xiao (bamboo flute), as well as a violin and piano, added to the authenticity and power of the music.

The impressive performances of students and instructors from the university's School of Music elicited spontaneous applause from the audience of about 600 and brought it to its feet for a standing ovation at the end.

The audience included several groups of young people, such as dance students from Carla's Kids Studio, the Wednesday Academy of First Baptist Church, and members of Girl Scout Troop 101 of Buffalo Presbyterian Church. All of the group's leaders said they brought the youngsters to give them an experience with another culture and increase their appreciation of it.

Professor Yu Guodong, director of Shanxi University's Foreign Affairs Office, and Professor Qiu Huaisheng, dean of the university's School of Fine Arts, accompanied the performers on their tour in North and South Carolina. Central Carolina Community College was the final stop on the tour.

"We want to bring Americans our traditional Chinese art," Professor Yu said. "We want to increase the mutual friendship between the peoples. My impression of Americans is that they are hospitable and kind, very kind. They are always ready to help and friendly. I hope they will feel the goodwill of these young people from China. Our two countries are closely related in many aspects; we are mutually interdependent."

CCCC student Adam Oliphant, of Bunnlevel, joined Zhou Na, a singer with the delegation, in announcing the numbers. Oliphant is studying Chinese at CCCC under Ling Huang, the Confucius Classroom visiting professor from Nanjing Normal University. Oliphant works at Carolina Tiger Rescue, in Pittsboro, and plans to travel to China to work on conservation of tigers in the wild.

Shanxi University is located in Taiyuan City, Shanxi Province, about 300 miles southwest of Beijing, People's Republic of China. The School of Music has established an impressive reputation through performances throughout China and in many other nations.

"I'm amazed the college can bring this talent from half a world away," Gary Simpson, of Pittsboro, said following the show. "I don't know how it could get better. This is as professional as we see anywhere."

Kinsley Raye, of Troop 101, summed up the feelings of the audience after the performance. Holding a red fabric lantern given to her by one of the dancers, she smiled when asked how she liked the show and said, "It was awesome!"

For more information about CCCC's Confucius Classroom, visit the college's Web site, www.cccc.edu/confucius or call (919) 718-7228 or (919) 718-7376.