College News

CCCC-Harnett celebrates college's 50th

CCCC-Harnett celebrates college's 50th

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Five teams competed in the June 2 Barbecue Cook-off at Central Carolina Community College's Harnet ... (more)

CCCC-Harnett celebrates college's 50th

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David Whittenton, of Dunn, checks his pork barbecue prior to the judging of the Barbecue Cook-off ... (more)

CCCC-Harnett celebrates college's 50th

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Belinda Cummings, of Harnett County, won the bidding for a handsome bulletin board clock at the Ce ... (more)

CCCC-Harnett celebrates college's 50th

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Robert Brown (front) Central Carolina Community College Laser and Photonics Technology student, de ... (more)

CCCC-Harnett celebrates college's 50th

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Thirteen-year-old Josh Currin (left), of Mamers, gets a description of how an aluminum cutout of t ... (more)

CCCC-Harnett celebrates college's 50th

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The 12th Annual Central Carolina Community College Foundation Furniture Auction June 2 at the col ... (more)

CCCC-Harnett celebrates college's 50th

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Shauna Warren (center), of Erwin, gets a trim from Central Carolina Community College Advanced Cos ... (more)

06.04.2012College & CommunitySpecial Events

LILLINGTON - Central Carolina Community College hosted a 50th Anniversary event at the college's Harnett County Campus June 2 and the community came out to celebrate with it.

"CCCC has been a real blessing to the people of Harnett County," said County Commissioner Dan Andrews. "I'm amazed how far it's come and the jobs it's created. It gives people who want to learn a chance to learn a trade that will help them get a job. It's also a stepping-stone for those who want to continue their education. Now, we're thrilled to have the new Health Sciences Building going up."

Central Carolina Community College offered its first extension classes in Lee County in 1961. It was then known as the Lee County Industrial Education Center. In 1965, it expanded into Harnett County, offering adult education and vocational classes at various locations.

From that modest beginning, it has grown in Harnett until it now offers curriculum, continuing education, career and college readiness, enrichment, and compensatory education classes at its full-service campus in Lillington, West Harnett Center, Lillington Adult Education Center, Triangle South Enterprise Center, and other community locations.

The anniversary celebration featured the 12th Annual CCCC Foundation Furniture Auction and a Barbecue Cook-off, as well as services and demonstrations provided by students in the college's cosmetology, barbering, laser and photonics, machining, and healthcare occupations programs.

Shauna Warren, of Erwin, and her daughter, Serenity, came to check out the celebration. That included getting a free hair trim from Advanced Cosmetology student Angela Cashwell, of Coats.

Warren is no stranger to the Harnett Campus. As she had her hair trimmed, she spoke her training as a Certified Nurse Aide at the campus back in 1998. She currently works as a CNA at Universal Health Care.

"If the college hadn't been here, I wouldn't have been able to take the CNA program," she said. "It was so convenient; I could work and take classes at night and the instructor was really helpful."

At the Foundation Furniture Auction, an overflow crowd of almost 200 enjoyed taking part, as bidders or watchers, as more than 100 pieces of handcrafted wood and metal indoor and outdoor furniture, home decor, storage buildings, and other items went up for bid. All the pieces were made by the college's carpentry and welding student inmates at the Harnett Correctional Institution.

Bidders made their moves as auctioneer Ricky Wicker called the action on each piece. More than $28,000 was raised. Profits from the event help to provide scholarships for Harnett County students at the college through an endowed scholarship fund managed by the Foundation.

Thirteen-year-old Josh Currin, of Mamers, was more interested in the information available at the Machining Technology Shop. He examined an aluminum cutout of the Peanuts cartoon dog Snoopy. The shape had been cut out by an electrical discharge machine, which uses a wire to cut through metal.

"I'm thinking of coming to the college some day," he said. "Maybe in welding, small engine repair, or machining. This is a really good college."

Visitors watched with anticipation as those taking part in the Cook-off created their special recipes of barbecue pork on the grills. Winner of the Cook-off was David Whittenton, of Dunn. The judges described his barbecue as "most tender; tasty, but not overpowering."

Close in the competition were the other teams: Gary Hughes and Wayne Wellington, of Angier; Mark Byrd, of Coats; Nothing Butt Luv'n team of Robert and Kristy Baggett, of Lillington; and Eddie Who's BBQ team of Eddie Stanley, of Benson, and Jeff Blackman, of Lillington.

Judges for the event were Marcie Dishman, director of the college's Marketing and Public Affairs Department; R.V. Hight, Sanford Herald editor; Norman Lichtman, of Dunn; and Danny Stevens, of Coats. Dishman, Hight and Lichtman are Kansas City Barbeque Society-certified judges, trained through a Continuing Education class the college offered.

"We had perfect weather, a beautiful day, a large crowd, a great auction, and the barbecue was delicious," CCCC President Bud Marchant said of the anniversary celebration. "We are so grateful for the support of and commitment to CCCC by the Harnett community."